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Isabella’s Story – A New Baby, a New Diagnosis, a New Life

Posted by: The Sumaira Foundation in NMO, Patient, Voices of NMO

While I was pregnant, I began having blurred vision. I went to see ophthalmologists, opticians, and general practitioners, but they kept saying nothing was wrong. I was sent to see a neurologist at a public hospital, but there were long wait times. Knowing I needed answers, I chose to go to a private hospital.

The doctors could tell something was wrong but didn’t have a diagnosis. I was sent back to the public hospital and admitted until they could find out what was wrong.

After numerous exams, tests, and MRIs, they came to a diagnosis. On February 2, 2018, they told me I had multiple sclerosis (MS) and needed to start treatment that included steroids. Being pregnant, we agreed the medication would have to wait until my child was born…

After six days in labor, I had a cesarean section, and my son came into the world on April 20, 2018.

Two weeks after he was born, the doctors started me on prednisolon and other medications. But the symptoms got worse, much worse.

My optic nerve became inflamed, my gait was off, and I was having pain in my arm that was getting worse. On June 22, I returned to the hospital and was admitted for more exams and blood work. This time they tested my spinal fluid.

After a month in the hospital, they discovered I was being overdosed on prednisolon, and I had to be transferred to another hospital for treatment. This led to more tests and scans and a new diagnosis.

It was not MS. I had NMO. With the new diagnosis came a new care plan with new medication and rehabilitation.

After 10.5 weeks, 2 hospitals, and rehabilitation, I was able to go home. I was finally able to go home to my son.

Today, I am thriving the best I can with this disease. I still have a lot of pain, but I am happier with life.

My son is doing well too. I had to retire from my job and am coming to terms with it.

On the other hand, I have more time and energy to be with my son, Elliot ❤️


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