PARTNERSHIP | TMA x TSF

On October 11, 2018, The Sumaira Foundation for NMO (TSF) announced its partnership with the Transverse Myelitis Association (TMA). Both organizations specialize in raising awareness for rare neuro-immune disorders while supporting patients and their caregivers. The spectrum of diseases include but are not limited to neuromyelitis optica (NMO), transverse myelitis (™), optic neuritis (ON), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuritis (CRION).

The TMA was founded in the state of Washington in 1994 by a community of individuals affected by these diagnoses. It became a 501(c)3 organization in December of 1996. TSF was founded in Massachusetts in 2014 by Sumaira Ahmed, two months after being diagnosed with sero-negative neuromyelitis optica.

With regards to the new relationship, Sumaira says,

“I am hopeful that joining forces with such a prestigious, organized, well-established, and mission-aligned organization like TMA  will only fortify our respective efforts, increase the NMOSD footprint, and accelerate progress made towards raising awareness and finding a cure.”

TMA’s Executive Director, Chitra Krishnan states,
“We are excited to partner with The Sumaira Foundation and look forward to working together to raise awareness, increase knowledge, and advance research in rare neuro-immune disorders. It has been wonderful getting to know Sumaira and her compelling passion and determination.”

One of the programs initiated by the TMA that TSF is most excited to support is the patient registry. According to the TMA website, “the purpose of this registry is to help advance research about rare neuro-immune disorders…,collaborate with researchers from around the world and identify participants for clinical trials. The TMA registry has been designed to learn more about the natural history of rare neuro-immune disorders, treatments and outcomes using standardized tools.”

Both TSF and TMA look forward to working together to help raise awareness and share resources for these rare neuro-immune diseases.